I don’t like the word Feminism

Before anyone tries to troll me on the comments I want to emphasise that I just don’t like the word feminism. I’m very supportive of its definition; one definition anyway.

I don’t want to name names, but over the last several months when I’ve come across commentary from some hollering-feminists I sometimes want to grit my teeth. Some feminists really don’t see feminism as a pursuit for equality, but for female chauvinism; and yet they can deter criticism by hiding behind the former definition. While I can sympathise with a great deal of the hurls at my own gender – because, let’s face it, it’s a man’s world and we have been the masters of serving many injustices within it – I find it loathsome when you can’t make any sort of trait-based comment to a person because they have a pair of matching chromosomes. Forget humour if amongst your audience you have people with a sense of humour bypass.

My problem with the word feminism is that it’s actually too cool sounding, and yet no better a word than masculinism or chauvinism. If you say you’re a supporter of feminism, that sounds much more radical than a supporter of equality – and yet I prefer the simple bluntness of ‘equality’.

One commentator that riled me up for no particular reason asked if there were any works by men that supported feminism because she knew that some had to exist. Well, of course they exist, many men in this century do support putting women on an equal footing; but you’d find about as many men passionate about female superiority as you would women who throw parties about chauvinism.

I’m a very liberal person but I sometimes wonder if – and this, as far as I know, is my own made-up word – superleftyism has allowed people with more passion than brain cells to lead us into faux umbrage. Some feminists want chauvinists to justify their existence; I’m sure.

I’ll just repeat, I have no problem with feminism as defined by reaching equality; I even have some admiration for a good bit of stylistic femichauvinism that ‘sticks it to the man’, but I have to roll my eyes when I hear commentary that isn’t only unhelpful but absurd. In fact, those feminists are the greatest disservice to true, Oxford English-defined feminists.

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6 thoughts on “I don’t like the word Feminism

  1. I wrote many comments and deleted them all. This is a difficult and dangerous subject. Let me just say that I know someone like that and people like her give feminism a bad name. She is probably the single most unhappy person I know, which may be part of the explanation why her views are so extreme.

  2. I guess if it stems from personal problems it’s more understandable; there are def guys that have a chip on their shoulder about women.

  3. So what type of feminism is “absurd” to you? Why do you porpose feminism is a large-scale movement as supposed to individuals taking to the streets and advocating men’s rights? Any form of feminism in this male dominated world is a must, and fight to resist. How can one advocate for equality if they’re not even heard? One needs to go to an extreme to get the least bit of equality. Incase you haven’t noticed, some women in the east aren’t allowed to do anything without a male gaurdian. In the west, they do have it considerably much better, but still a far stretch from attaining equality. I’m not so sure why “absurd” feminists would bother you so much, but it goes without say that this is another display of large-scale male dominance. Feminist movements upset many more males than it does females. No coincidence. Some are more direct about it, while others like to throw around words like “equality” or “equal rights” to replace “feminism,” simply because it makes them sick to the bone.
    Feminism will persist untill all is fair and just in this world.

    • I think I made it clear in the post. I support the dictionary definition of feminism and oppose what I would call ‘feminazism’ which promotes a new gender dis-equality. I dislike feminazism on the same grounds as male chauvinism.

      Secondly, going to extremes to get equality is debatable, e.g. in segregated America you could either have supported Malcolm X and Nation of Islam (which believes in black superiority) or Martin Luther King Jr. While you sometimes need to use force, force all the way never wins. You have to win hearts, not break them.

      The only movement that annoys me is feminazism under the guise of feminism. I also still think equality would be a more effective term to use because it has no emphasis on masc or fem. Verbally, the word feminism seems to give the upper hand to women, I want no one to have the upper hand.

      • Feminism does not give an upper hand to anyone. I think you should double check the dictionary for that term. It just advocates the rights that women were denied..in other words, equality. Therefore, no sane-minded person who believes in equal rights should dislike this term.

  4. I didn’t say that feminism does give the upper hand to anyone. What I’m saying is that I’d much rather equality wasn’t labelled feminism or masculinism; you make it an easier sell to both parties that way. Feminazis can’t hijack that word either.

    As I said, disliking the ‘word’ feminism doesn’t make me any less sane. Picky, yes. But if I insisted on people referring to food only as edibles, that’s just a preference.

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